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Posts Tagged ‘proceno’


At the beginning of the second millennium, a huge number of pilgrims travelled to Via-Francigena3three major destinations:  Rome, the city of the martyrdom of Saints Peter and Paul, the italy-via-francigenafounders of the Christian church; The Holy Land, site of Calvary, where the pilgrims viafrancigena4sought out the places of Christ’s Passion; Santiago de Compostela, the furthest point of western Europe which the Holy Apostle James chose as his final resting place. Thus Europe became a vast web of roads, paths and routes all of which led towards these pilgrimage sites. The way to Rome was along what was probably the most important road of the times, the Via Francigena or Via Romea which led to the Eternal City from the Western Alps and the Rhineland and was used for seven centuries by sovereigns, emperors, plebeians and clergymen. The Via Francigena led all the way from Canterbury to Rome and was one of the pathways of European history. It was a main thoroughfare along which hundreds of thousands of pilgrims passed on their way to Rome. In those days, the journey was not just an adventure or a risk but an act of devotion in itself, and the pilgrims would stop off along the way at places deemed holy by the Church.
The Via Francigena cut through the Alps in the Valley of Aosta and proceeded southwards through Piedmont, Lombardy, the flatlands of the river Po (Padania) before going through the Apennines near Berceto to pass into Tuscany and Latium, and then Rome. This route is an essential and formative phenomenon in the history of Europe.
If we look at the Etrurian section, we can identify the route and the posting stages. From Proceno, a resting station, the pilgrims moved on to Acquapendente which was a fundamental part of the journey as it contained a precious reliquary from the Holy Land, now kept in the Cathedral crypt. They then travelled down to Bolsena, an important town because of the Corpus Domini miracle, and on to Montefiascone, a mediaeval town even then known for its wine. The next stage was Viterbo which, indeed, developed and grew thanks to its strategic position on the Via Francigena. Viterbo thus became a cardinal destination on the itinerary and was well supplied with hospices and lodgings. The traces of this concentration of pilgrim activity are still very much to be seen today. After Viterbo, travellers faced the obstacle of the Cimini mountains which they traversed by going either to the right or to the left along the Vico Lake. The more popular choice varied from age to age. One way led to Ronciglione and the little church of Saint Eusebius. The other led through chestnut woods and we may still make out traces of an old path that passed by the Cistercian Abbey of St Martins in Cimino. The pilgrims would then make their way to Vetralla where a country road led them to the little church of Santa Maria in Forcassi, mentioned by Sigericus. After this, the road led to Capranica, Sutri, Monterosi and then the pilgrims left the Via Cassia for the Via Trionfale that led them into Rome at last.

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All about the title gets the meaning of new project of Albergo Diffuso in Italy.
Then in Latium as in Italy we have some historic villages where apartments, restaurants and workhops and other kind of touristic services are joined in the same place as all in a village.
In particular in Latium you can visit the following Albergo Diffuso:

In Albergo Diffuso you can get the same service as in hotel, that’s mean blankets, towels, breakfast, television and so on.
The amazing situation it’s that you will sleep in an apartment or room totally restructured from the ancient face and perfectly ready to be used. Usually the apartments are 200 mt. no more far from the main service such as reception, pool, restaurants and others common area.

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The village of Torre Alfina (602 m. high) overlooks the landscape thanks to the strategic position that gave rise to the most ancient tower, which today is incorporated in the castle.
With the expansion of the village, the original fortress was fortified with a second ring of walls made of bastions, walls of houses and many gateways. Two of these gates disappeared with the renovation works of Marquis Cahen, while Porta Vecchia is still visible. The palace was built near the tower; and was the home to the successive Lords.
In particular the Renaissance style reconstruction of the original medieval castle is thanks to Sforza Cervara, a former mercenary captain. Part of the inner courtyard, one of the wings of the building decorated with frescoes, some furniture and the coat-of-arms of the family remain from that period.
Preserved in the parish church are some works of art that were in the gentilitial chapel. Two late XVI century paintings, a Deposition in which Sforza Cervara and his family are depicted whilst praying; a Nativity where it is possible to recognize the crests of Monaldeschi Family and that of the Community, and two seventeenth century altar-pieces.
The Monaldeschi Palace was renovated by Edward Cahen. Various parts of the village were involved and completely transformed, such as the area that faces the entrance ramp to the castle or the one overlooking Piazza Sant’Angelo, which is occupied by a roof garden and by the entrance staircase. This colossal work, which carried on until the end of the 1920’s, was assigned to the architect Giuseppe Partini from Siena.
Today Torre Alfina is a village that flourishes once again exploiting its history and potential of clean air, greenery, cultural facilities and accommodation.
The Museo del Fiore and the ancient water mill, which has been recently restored, make the Park a gem in the Mount Rufeno Nature Reserve.  Inside the village there is a series of ceramic plaques recalling the places that no longer exist, while the Chambre d’Amis, is a permanent outdoor exhibition of contemporary art, that highlights its most significant corners.
In the main town of Acquapendente, you will find the Crypt of the Holy Sepulchre, where there is the sacellum that reproduces the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem where, legend has it, that the stones covered in the blood of Christ during the Passion are preserved.
Local products are: The food and wine of this area are excellent, as in the rest of Italy, but here, already in the early sixties, the typical product was home-made ice cream, which drew lovers of ice-cream from Lazio and Tuscany.
During the low season the ice-cream makers are engaged in the careful selection of the best ingredients, such as hazelnuts from Langhe, pistachios from Sicily and ricotta cheese from Lazio, to create an exceptionally creamy product, thanks also to the high quality of the fresh milk and cream.

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The Castello di Proceno is a 12th century fortress built to protect the ancient hamlet. The surrounding region is full of Etruscan, Medieval and Renaissance monuments that testify to the presence of ancient civilizations. The castle is a rare example of a medieval fortification surviving in its original state. Its pentagonal base incorporates a main tower and two secondary towers interconnected by walkways and a drawbridge. The complex includes a fort that is attached to one side of the castle by the town’s defensive walls.  In the distance is Mount Amiata where you can also find the Hunting Lodge of the Castle’s Lords. The swimming pool is situated just outside the Castle ramparts on spacious grounds of wide panoramic terraces connected to the tower gardens by a landscaped path through a park of cypresses. Relaxed lunches and intimate candle-light dinners are served in the charming dining room or on the covered loggia, all in a congenial and cosy atmosphere. The excellent food prepared personally by the owner, features seasonal produce in an enticing combination of international and Italian dishes. Each of the seven apartments is very well furnished and offers maximum comfort together with views of the valleys or the courtyard.
For more informations call: +39.0763.710072

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