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Archive for the ‘Palaces’ Category


Brancaccio Palace is the last Roman Patrician Palace built in 1880 in the heart of the eternal city, Rome. Located on Colle Oppio, near Emperor palazzo-brancaccioNero’s,”Domus Aurea” and the seven hills, between Colosseum and the famous Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore.
Princess Mary Elisabhet Field, american wife of Salvatore Brancaccio, in 1879 relied on architect Gaetano Koch the construction of the palace situated in a beautiful natural old park between roman ruins, centuries old plants and fountains, mixed by vegetable essence.
In the Park you can also admire the small and charming Hunting Lodge turned into a Coffee House, rich of decorations and painted by Francesco Gay.
Inside the Palace you can fild anchanting banquet rooms where Mary Elisabeth Field gave magnificent sumptuous parties also in honour of the King Umberto of Savoy. The same halls in 1969 have been completely restored and reserved for unforgettable private and public manifestations by the Roma Party Company that for more than 30 years has the honour to manage this artistic patrimony. Many important multinational firms are faithful customers. Today this Palace is considered as one of the most beautiful venue in Rome, where getting together is to find again the plasure for living.

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Palazzo Mancini Torlonia is an aristocratic mansion, built in the sixteenth century, near Villa Gregoriana and Villa d’Este.
palazzo-manciniUnique around tiburtino, it is famous to the hospitality given to Popes Paolo IV and Gregorio XVI, and for the courtyard of the palace of grotesque decorations and mosaics attributable to the workers who built the Villa d’Este.
The palace, after a thorough restoration, offers two exclusive suites Araldica e Gregoriana, a library, living room with fireplace and a music room with pipe organ built by a renowned master craftsman.
Guests have access to the wellness center with turkish bath, sauna, jacuzzi, swimming against the current, with exclusive service of personal trainers and massage.
Termae Gregoriane is a private club for discovery and frequenting the spa in the wake of the traditional “mens sana in corpore sano”.
The thermal path will pass in heated rooms with increasing temperature final bath in the swimming pool of salt water treated with fragrant resins.

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In south-east direction from Rome after 35 km. , between Lago di Albano and Lago di Nemi, there is Ariccia. Aricia boasts very ancient origins. As in all Latin cities, the first inhabitants of these places had to fight to maintain their independence. “Aricia” was the capital of the Latin League at the end of the 4th century B.C., and the battle of Aricia successfully thwarted the military ambitions of the Etruscans in Southern Latium.
The “Ariccini” also fought against Rome until being subjugated in the 4th century B.C. Ariccia became one of the most important Roman communities because of its geographical position between two volcanic lakes, Albano Lake and Nemi Lake. The people of Ariccia were devout worshippers of the goddess Diana, . Her temple, located in the “Nemus Aricinum”, now Nemi, was one of the main sanctuaries in the Latin territory dedicated to the goddess .
During the Middle Ages, Ariccia was sacked and pillaged by barbarians during the Roman campaign. In 1473 Ariccia passed into the hands of the Savelli Family, which started the reconstruction of the territory, and began work on the noble palace. Acquired in the 17th Century from the Chigi, Family, the town was completely re-zoned by the architectural genius of Gian Lorenzo Bernini . He collaborated with many artists, Carlo Fontana. being the most well known amongst them.
In the beginning of the 1700’s, Ariccia became a haven for important artists and writers of the time. In the course of the 19th century, the layout of the town changed greatly when the Appian Way, which went down through the valley (Valle Ariccia) was bonified, under the auspices of Pope Pius IX. Thanks to him, in fact, a bridge with three orders of arches was constructed over the thickly wooded area (now Chigi Park), where the road reached up to Galloro hill.

About the Palazzo Chigi ,the ducal palace of Ariccia is a unique example of a baroque home which has remained virtually unchanged in its environment and with its original furnishings, and is a testament to the great wealth of one of the most important Italian papal lines: the Chigi family.
The family was also the owner of the Chigi palace in Rome which today houses the offices of the Council of Ministers of Italy. Begun in the second half of the sixteenth century by the Savelli family, the palace was transformed into a lavish baroque home between 1664 and 1672 using plans by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, with the collaboration of his young student Carlo Fontana.
The palace houses a large collection of paintings, sculptures and decoration, mostly dating back to the seventeenth century, which also came from the family’s Roman residence, which was sold to the state in 1918. Perhaps due to the Spanish feel of the décor, Luchino Visconti decided to set his famous film “The Leopard” here, filming several scenes within the palace.
The palace was given to the City of Ariccia on 29th December 1988 under special conditions, by Prince Agostino Chigi Albani della Rovere, and is now a museum and cultural center, hosting various activities such as exhibits, concerts, guided tours, meetings, and the like.

Suggested accommodation for this area : http://www.romahappydays.com/ariccia-flat/

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The MONTECASSINO Monastery, was founded by St. Benedict about 529 of the Christian Era on the remnants of a preexisting Roman fortification of the municipium Casinum.
The heathen cult was still practised on this mountain site in the temple of Apollo and in a nearby holy grove to which a sacrifice area was adjoining. Montecassino became famous for the prodigious life and the Sepulchre of its Founder.
Through the ages, the abbey was looked upon as a place of holiness, culture and art for which it became renowned on world-wide level. Around 577, the monastery was destroyed by the Longobards of Zotone, Duke of Beneventum, but early in the eighth century Pope Gregory II commissioned the Brescian Petronace to rebuild the monastery.
For the Cassinese abbey this was the beginning of a period of great splendour: the Saxon Monk Villibald, the Monk Sturmius disciple of S. Boniface, Founder of Fulda and of German monasticism, Gisulf II Duke of Beneventum, Carlomanno brother of Pippin, Ratchis king of the Longobards, Anselm future abbot of Nonantola all flocked to Montecassino.
In 787 Charlemagne came to visit the Abbey and granted it vast privileges. The Abbey before last destruction In 883, the Saracens invaded and sacked the Monastery and burnt it down, causing the death of Bertarius its saint Abbot, Founder of mediaeval Cassino.
The surviving monks first fled to Teano and later to Capua. Monastic life was only fully resumed towards the middle of the tenth century, thanks to Abbot Aligerno. Various great Abbots governed Montecassino in the eleventh century, such as Theobald, Richerius, Frederick of Lorraine who later will become Pope under the name of Stephen IX.
They restored Montecassino to its former political and ecclesiastic height, culminating under Abbot Desiderius, a truly outstanding personality. He was a friend to Pope Gregory VII whom he assisted in his struggle for independence of the Church, later to become his successor under the name Victor III.
The Basilica was rebuilt under his abbotship and the monastery was enriched with numerous beautifully miniated manuscripts, mosaics, enamels, oriented liturgic goldsmithery. The third destruction, caused by an earthquake, occurred in 1349. Nothing but a few walls remained of Abbot Desiderius’ splendid building. Photo n. 2 Many additions and embellishments were made during reconstruction so that the abbey acquired the greatness and imposingness it conserved until February 15, 1944, during the final stage of world war II when Montecassino happened to be on the firing line between two armies: this place of prayer and study which had become in these exceptional circumstances a peaceful shelter for hundreds of defenceless civilians, in only three hours was reduced to a heap of debris under which many of the refuges met their death (photo n.2).
The Abbey was rebuilt according to the ancient architectural pattern and to the “where and as was” program of Abbot Ildefonso Rea, its reconstructor. Reconstruction and decoration works took more than a decade and where exclusively financed by the Italian State. After so many historical events, Montecassino may truly be simbolized by a many centuries-old oak, which although broken by the storm, always becomes green and alive again, stronger than ever: “succisa virescit”.

The high number of pilgrims that every day come to the Abbey, by hundreds and thousands, keeps the Fathers from granting the requests submitted to them, first of all to guide the visitors through the Monastery.
Visitors are demanded to respect the sacrality of the place they are in (they don’t have to consider it as a pleasure-ground) and they have to mantain a severe and intent behaviour, avoiding to speak aloud or make noise inside the cloisters.
On behalf of visitors is particularly requested to keep silent in the Church.

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Address: Piazza del Plebiscito – Roma
Phone: +39.06.699.941
Ticket: 4,00 Euro

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Palazzo Spada


Address: Piazza Capo di Ferro, 13- Roma
Phone: +39.06.687.4896
Ticket: Call and Book

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Quirinale


Address: Piazza del Quirinale – Roma
Phone: +39.06.46991
Ticket: 5,00 Euro

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Montecitorio


Address: Piazza di Montecitorio – Roma
Phone: +39.06.67601
Ticket: Call and Book

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